Uses of Carnivorous Plants

Uses of Carnivorous Plants

Herbal Syrup  Venus flytrap extract Rosolio Sundew Ale

Uses of Carnivorous Plants

Carnivorous Plants are used in a variety of folk preparations and medicines. From Asia, the fluid from young unopened Monkey Pitchers (Nepenthes) is used for drinking, cleaning wounds or treating incontinence, distress and pain. Their lianas (woody vines) can serve as ropes and their pitchers are used as a pot to boil rice. Scandinavians have used butterworts (Pinguicula) to curdle milk for yogurt or cheese. It is also reported to heal festered sores, and provide protection from the mischief of witches and faeries. Sundew (Drosera) extracts are commonly used in cough syrups and expectorants. In Renaissance Turin, Italy Drosera rotundifolia was used to create a cordial water called "rosa solis" or rosolio. It was initially presented as a medicine and aphrodisiac before it became a popular drink. Research is being conducted on the cancer preventative qualities of a Venus Flytrap extract. Sarracenia extract reportedly works against viral infections, and is used as an ingredient is some cold sore medications, and research is being done in association with other viral infections.

Please note that descriptions of medicinal uses of carnivorous plants is included for reference purposes only and should not be put into practice.

Perhaps in the future, genetic engineers may fashion common vegetables with carnivorous capabilities. This may reduce our reliance on pesticides and fertilizers.

Carnivorous Plants make a valuable contribution to instructional programs geared to the value and preservation of our wetlands. I have seen many youngsters appreciate wetlands more, once they realize this is the home of the Venus Flytrap. Carnivorous Plants make good subjects in studies of evolution, adaptation, plant propagation and conservation.

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